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Obama Victory in North Carolina

Obama Wins North Carolina Primary

     
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM and LARRY ROHTER

Published: May 7, 2008

Senator Barack Obama captured a decisive victory in the North Carolina primary on Tuesday, fending off a challenge from his opponent, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, who was leading in the night’s other contest in Indiana.

Doug Mills/The New York Times


With 11 percent of North Carolina precincts reporting, Mr. Obama led with 65 percent of the vote to Mrs. Clinton’s 35 percent. A decisive victory in the state may help Mr. Obama revive his campaign’s momentum after a series of recent stumbles involving the negative coverage of his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.

But a victory in Indiana would allow Mrs. Clinton to continue her campaign into the final rounds of the Democratic nominating fight.

In Indiana, Mrs. Clinton had 55 percent of the vote to Mr. Obama’s 45 percent, with 46 percent of precincts reporting. But that margin is likely to narrow as more votes are counted, especially from the area near Chicago, where the Illinois senator is considered a favorite, and from Indianapolis.

Mrs. Clinton, of New York, focused her campaign in Indiana on attracting the predominantly white, blue-collar voters who were essential to her victories in two other nearby industrial states, Ohio and Pennsylvania. She also sought support from older voters and rural counties to overcome Mr. Obama’s advantage in Indianapolis and the area around Chicago, which have large black populations.

Based on early returns on Tuesday, that strategy appeared to be working. Mrs. Clinton held significant leads — in some cases, a two-to-one ratio — in rural districts where nearly all precincts have already reported.

Turnout was said to be near a record high in both states. “I’ve seen people I thought had passed on to glory, and young folks that usually sit around and don’t care,” said Carlotta Blake-King, an elections judge at a polling place in Hammond, Ind. Link to New York Times story>>

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